monkeyinabox: look here....or you could just go through life and be happy anyway

the daily banana

Mostly Fresh And Only Somewhat Stale

10.20.2010

Amazing views all around

October has been another busy month. Seriously, I keep thinking about writing something and then I get swamped with other projects. Even though I still have other projects I'm working on, I thought I better do this post before it's old and stale. You can't even stick an 'old and stale' blog entry in the microwave with a cup of water to freshen it up. Nope, it just goes bad. So...

A few weeks ago, The Teachers parents visited for a weekend. We kept busy with a volleyball game in Prineville and other typical things you do when family visits. The Teachers dad is always game for going to out-doorsy places, so when he mentioned wanting to see East Lake, I thought it sounded like a good enough idea to me.

Now, I should mention that the last time Terry and I went out exploring, it was back in March to the Oregon Outback. I was going to do a post about that, however The Teachers appendix decided to rupture and ruin that (among other things). So, first I'm going to recap that adventure since it shows a little more on the odd places Terry and I are willing to go.

Hole In The Ground
From the USGS.GOV site:

Hole-in-the-Ground is a nearly circular maar with a floor 150 meters below and a rim 35 to 65 meters above original ground level. Its diameter from rim to rim is 1,600 meters. The volume of the crater below the original surface is only 60 percent of the volume of ejecta. Only 10 percent of the ejecta is juvenile basaltic material. Most of the ejected material is fine grained, but some of the blocks of older rocks reached dimensions of 8 meters. The largest blocks were hurled distances of up to 3.7 kilometers from the center of the crater. Accretionary lapilli, impact sags, and vesiculated tuffs are well developed.

When we arrived at the turn-off for Hole-in-the-Ground, we saw that the road wasn't officially open yet. Hmmmm. Adding to that fact there were bullet casings all over the ground as well. Of course, what's adventure without your sense of adventure? We continued on to the holy greatness a head.

Hole-in-the-Ground

If you look close you can see the tiny trail leading down to the center of the hole (in the ground). If you were silly enough to walk all the way down, then you would be rewarded with a steep hike back out of the hole. Since it didn't look like anything better would be down in the center, we mostly stayed up around the rim (avoiding any nasty hikes back up).

Hole-in-the-Ground

Fort Rock
From the hole, we next traveled to Fort Rock. The Fort Rock Homestead Village Museum was closed, so all we could do was peek over the fence that had numerous warning signs about trespassers being shot (or something like that). Given the size of the town, I didn't doubt it. What else do the police around here have to do?

Fort Rock

After I took a few photos, we headed towards the actual rock. Around this area there are plenty of things that seem to give you the impression that staring at the rock is a moving experience. Stay at the motel with views of the rock, buy property with views of the rock, eat at the diner with views of the rock, etc. After seeing something like Ayers Rock, it was hard to be as impressed (yet alone consider moving here). of course, Terry would have been game for it.

Fort Rock

Since the afternoon was growing late, we didn't hike around the entire top. The view was what it was.

Fort Rock

We had hoped to see some more stuff around Christmas Valley, but since we didn't have a 4WD vehicle, that derailed some of our plans. However, it was an adventure of some sorts to say the least.

Newberry National Volcanic Monument
Fast forward back to the present month of October. Terry mentioned that he wanted to see East Lake. Once again I was game for an adventure and the weather wasn't too bad (or so we thought).

Once again we headed South of Bend and took the road up to Paulina Lake. It was definitely the end of the Summer season, and despite being a Saturday afternoon the ranger booth was closed (which meant no day pass fees for us).

Paulina Creek Falls
Our first stop was at Paulina Creek Falls.

Paulina Creek Falls

Seriously this is a pretty cool waterfall and it doesn't take much walking to get to. After checking it out we walked further down the trail to where the road to the lodge crossed the creek. There was another small falls here and in the pool below there were many Kokanee Salmon swimming and jumping out of the water. It was interesting to watch.

Paulina Creek Falls

Big Obsidian Flow
Our next site of interest was the Big Obsidian Flow trail. It was becoming apparent that a storm was moving in. The clouds and the mist added to the desolate landscape of black obsidian.

Big Obsidian Flow

We wandered up the trail to the first interpretive sign. It was hard to tell exactly how long the trail was, and when we saw a couple coming down we decided to ask their opinion of it. The woman replied that her shoes weren't up to par (despite the fact they looked like decent hiking shoes to me) and that the trail just went up and up. Not exactly encouraging advice. Since I had my big tripod, I really didn't have a desire to trip or cut up my shoes. Terry had no interest in going any further as well.

Big Obsidian Flow

We looked around briefly and then headed back down the trail.

Big Obsidian Flow

On the way in we passed the road to Paulina Peak. Since I had read it was fine for passenger cars, we decided to venture up and see what we could see.

Paulina Peak
As we drove up and up the view started to get worse and worse with the clouds and fog. Yep, we made it to the top and this is the view we were rewarded with.

Paulina Peak

Not much was up here to see. Maybe just this squirrel.

Paulina Peak

Mostly, it looked like this and only seemed to be getting worse.

Paulina Peak

I guess the moral of the story is don't expect amazing clear views from mountains in October.

So there it is, a recap that's mostly fresh and only somewhat stale.


Posted by monkeyinabox ::: |

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